Cattle in the stockyards with men standing on the catwalk. Special Collections Department, Stewart Library, Weber State University
Special Collections Department, Stewart Library, Weber State University

Livestock heads in stone relief from the exterior of the Ogden Union Stockyards Exchange Building. Column detail in lobby of the Ogden Union Stockyards Exchange Building. Photo credit www.Evalogue.Life - Tell Your Story, taken in 2017

Growing the food that graced America’s tables

A hundred years ago, chances are you made your living growing food


Even if your family had other employment back in the day, if you lived outside the city you probably grew extra hogs for sale, had sheep in the pasture, and few head of cattle. Most families still lived on farms that were originally homesteads or obtained in pioneer times. Here, they dry farmed hay to feed livestock and perhaps raised other animals. Our economy was supported by wool growers, cattle ranchers, hog farmers and feed growers. Click below to read more about each of these producers. 

"San Peter" sheared 51 pounds at head of W.D. Candland's flock, Mt. Pleasant Utah, Ewes and Rams for sale 1920. Photo of a ram taken from the 1920 National Wool Grower publication

Wool Growers and Sheep Herders


In the rural west, lands were grazed not only by cattle but also sheep. Wool growers recruited Basque sheepherders from Spain, who lived in wagons on the open range. It was a lonesome life. A full article is coming soon… 

Man with his Hereford bulls with a sign reading, "First prize, Registered Hereford Bulls" from the Ogden Union Stockyards. Photo credit Special Collections Department, Stewart Library, Weber State University

Cattle Ranchers


Cattle are often the first image we associate with the stockyards, and for good reason. Just look at these beauts above.

A full article is coming soon… 

Hogs being unloaded from a truck at the Ogden Union Stockyards. Photo obtained from Don Strack.

Hog Farmers


Many western families produced a few hogs for sale, often herding them a few miles from the homestead into town, where they would be loaded onto trucks and often  transported by rail to Ogden. 

A full article is coming soon…

Calf inside a pen with hay in the background at the Ogden. Union Stockyards. Photo obtained from Don Strack.

Feed Growers


All those animals had to eat, and many local farms produced hay. Even byproducts from other produce became feed, like the stinky “pug stack” of spent pea vines from the Del Monte pea canning operation down the road.

A full article is coming soon..

 

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